most common Italian last names

Top 500 Most Common Italian Last Names with Meaning + Origin

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Ciao friends! Get ready to dive into the captivating stories behind 500 of the most popular Italian last names. 

Whether you’re exploring your ancestral roots or simply love learning about names, you’ll discover the fascinating meanings and origins of the most common surnames in Italy. 

Immerse yourself in centuries of Italian heritage as we spotlight the top 500 quintessential Italian last names.

Key Insights


What Is the Most Common Last Name in Italy?

The most common last name in Italy is “Rossi.” This name, derived from the color “rosso” meaning red, and is widespread across the country. 

The surname’s popularity can be attributed to its origins in the Middle Ages when it was commonly used to refer to individuals with red hair or a rosy complexion. 

Over time, the name expanded beyond its literal meaning to encompass a broader range of individuals and spelling variations, so much so that it became the most common surname in Italy.


italian people in piazza

For Italians, surnames are far more than just labels – they represent a vital part of identity and a link to ancestral origins. Rooted in tradition and lineage, Italian family names foster a strong sense of belonging and community.

Italians have a profound attachment to their surnames, which reflect the depth of Italian culture and the value placed on honoring heritage. Each name carries its own story, passed down through generations as a symbol of pride and a reminder of the past. Unlike some cultures where surnames are relatively new inventions, Italian surnames can be traced back hundreds of years. 

To preserve the integrity of family names, Italian laws govern how surnames can be claimed and changed. There are strict rules regarding women keeping maiden names after marriage or hyphenating names. Inheriting and transferring surnames to children also follows set procedures. These regulations reflect the cultural value Italians place on ancestral surnames. For most Italians, their surname is a cherished part of who they are.

How Do Last Names Work in Italy?

In Italy, last names, known as “cognomi”, follow specific conventions and traditions. The majority of Italian surnames are derived from various sources, including occupations, geographical locations, personal characteristics, patronymics (based on the father’s name), or nicknames. It is common for surnames to be associated with a particular region of Italy or town, reflecting the geographical roots of families.

Traditionally, Italian surnames have been passed down through the male line, with children typically inheriting their father’s surname. This practice, known as the “patronymic system,” highlights the importance of lineage and family heritage in Italy. However, recent changes in Italian law have allowed parents to choose whether the child should bear the father’s or mother’s surname, providing greater flexibility and equality in naming practices.

Do Italians Take Their Husband’s Surname?

Contrary to what you might be thinking, rightly so because of the patriarchal customs common in Italy, Italian women do not take their husbands’ surnames. Let me explain.

In Italy, when a woman gets married, she typically retains her maiden surname for all legal matters. However, she has the option to add her husband’s surname in social settings if she wishes to do so. 

It’s important to note that she is not legally allowed to sign using her husband’s surname unless she formally requests a change of surname. 

This process involves following the necessary legal procedures and obtaining the approval of the competent authorities. By maintaining her maiden surname for legal purposes, while having the choice to incorporate her husband’s surname in social contexts, an Italian woman can navigate the intricacies of her identity and personal preferences in both legal and social spheres.

Whose Last Name Do Newborn Children in Italy Take?

In Italy, it is customary for newborn children to take their father’s last name. This practice follows the tradition of the “patronymic system,” where the father’s surname is passed down to the next generation.

However, recent changes in Italian law have provided parents with more flexibility in naming their children. While the default convention is for children to inherit the father’s surname, parents can choose to give their child the mother’s surname instead or opt for a double-barreled surname that combines both parents’ last names. 

Double Surnames

In Italy, the use of double surnames, also known as “cognomi doppi” or “cognomi composti”, became legal on the 8th of November 2016. Since then, having two surnames has become increasingly common. 

A double surname consists of two surnames from both the mother and the father, hyphenated together or separated by a space. This naming practice allows for the preservation of both parents’ last names and reflects a more egalitarian approach to family and identity.

The choice to use a double surname is entirely optional and requires the consent of both parents. It provides a means to honor the lineage of both sides of the family, recognizing the importance of both maternal and paternal ancestry. 

It is important to note that the order of the surnames in a double surname can vary. Some families choose to place the father’s surname first, while others prefer the mother’s surname as the initial component. The decision ultimately depends on personal preference.

Surname Change

In Italy, changing one’s surname is a legal process that requires following specific procedures and obtaining approval from the competent authorities. While the default convention is for individuals to keep their birth surnames throughout their lives, there are circumstances in which a surname change may be permitted.

Common reasons for a surname change in Italy include marriage, adoption, or a desire to get rid of a ridiculous last name.

In cases where individuals wish to change their surname for any of the above reasons, it is possible to do so through a legal process. This typically involves submitting an application to the local Civil Registry Office (Ufficio dell’ Anagrafe) and providing valid reasons for the requested change. The decision to approve the surname change ultimately rests with the local authorities, who must assess the application based on specific criteria and legal requirements.

It’s important to note that changing one’s surname in Italy is not a simple or automatic process. The decision is subject to scrutiny and requires a well-founded justification. Additionally, the change of surname does not affect the individual’s birth certificate, which will still include their original surname. However, the new surname will be recognized in official documents and records moving forward.


italian directory of last names

Italian Surnames: a Language Overview

Whether you are writing or saying your name and surname in Italian, that’s exactly the order you would use – first the name, then the surname.

For example, if I want to introduce myself, I would say: “Ciao, sono Alessia Spampinato.”

Another thing to note is that all Italian surnames are pronounced as they are written, just as anything else.

When writing compound surnames, that is those surnames that consist of two words, where one of the words is either an article or a preposition, the particle preceding the actual surname is not capitalized when used along with the first name. It is, however, written in capital letters if used alone with the surname.

For example, my friend’s surname would be written like this: Vanessa di Bella or Di Bella.

Do all Italian Surnames End in a Vowel?

While it is true that many Italian surnames end in a vowel, not all Italian surnames follow this pattern. The prevalence of surnames ending in vowels is a notable characteristic of the Italian language and reflects its phonetic structure. Italian, as a language, often emphasizes vowel sounds, which can be seen in surnames as well.

An interesting fact to note is that many last names ending in n are from the Veneto region, whereas those ending in s are usually from Sardinia.

Italian Surnames Ending with an N

There are at least 2080 Italian surnames ending with N. Here are a few examples:

A fun theory about surnames in the region of Venice is that the surnames ending with a consonant resulted from judgments handed down by the Court of the Serenissima.

PS: The Serenessima is an alternate name traditionally used to refer to the Republic of Venice. It translates to the most serene, reflecting the calm social and political state of Venice at that time.


Italian Surnames Ending with Other Consonants

Italian Surnames ending with other consonants other than N that I know are:

Italian Compound Surnames

Many Italian surnames are preceded by either an article or a preposition. To be noted is that in some cases, compound names might indicate a noble surname, but this is not always so.

Compound Names with an Article

Here’s a list of Italian last names that include an article at the beginning:

As you can see from the list above, the articles preceding them can be either feminine or masculine. This doesn’t however mean that Italian surnames are gendered. The use of the feminine or masculine article depends exclusively on the gender of the noun making up the surname. To clarify things further, in Italian, surnames do not change depending on whether they are used by a woman or a man.

Double Surnames Merged in One Word

In a few instances, the compound surname – made up of the article and the second word – merges to become a single word. See the examples below:

Compound Surnames with a Preposition

The compound surnames below are all preceded by a preposition:

most common Italian last names

The study of surnames in Italy, known as onomastics, is a complex field that explores personal names, including surnames. The onomastic formula in ancient Rome consisted of praenomen, nomen, and cognomen, with the cognomen eventually gaining more significance. After the fall of the Western Roman Empire, surnames were absent during the early Middle Ages, but reemerged later among noble and lower social classes.

The Council of Trent played a role in formalizing the use of surnames in Italy by introducing the creation of baptismal registers, making modern surnames legally and historically significant. The origins of Italian surnames are often uncertain but can be derived from nicknames, toponyms, professions, patronymics, or physical characteristics. Mutations, dialectal influences, misspellings, and Italianization further complicate the understanding of surname origins.

Italy has an extensive variety of surnames, with approximately 350,000 different surnames, one of the highest in Europe. Notable studies on surname origins and semantics include Ludovico Antonio Muratori’s “De cognominum origine,” Emidio De Felice’s “Dizionario dei cognomi italiani,” and Roberto Bizzocchi’s “I cognomi degli Italiani. Una storia lunga 1000 anni.” These works provide valuable insights into the complex and fascinating world of Italian surnames, shedding light on their historical development and cultural significance.

Italian Surnames by Region

Toponyms, which are place names or geographical references, play a significant role in the origin of Italian surnames. Throughout history, Italians often adopted surnames derived from the names of towns, cities, villages, or specific regions associated with their ancestral origins. 

This naming practice helped establish a connection between individuals and their ancestral homeland, preserving a sense of identity and heritage. For example, surnames such as Milano, Romano, Fiorentino, or Napoli are derived from the respective cities of Milan, Rome, Florence, and Naples.

Below, you’ll find a list of the most common Surnames in each of the 20 Italian Regions. 

most common Italian last names article


Northern Italian Last Names

Aosta Valley: Bianchi, Bonin, Carrel, Chenal, Cretaz, Rollandin, Favre, Festaz, Martinet, Vaudan

Lombardy: Rossi, Bianchi, Colombo, Ferrari, Esposito

Trentino: Rossi, Ferrari, Fontana, Bernardi, Dal Maso, Zanella, Marchetti, De Rossi, Cattaneo, Zamboni

Piedmont: Ferrero, Ferrari, Russo, Esposito, Bianchi, Rossi

Veneto: Russo, Ferrari, Esposito, Bianchi, Romano

Friuli Venezia Giulia: Rossi, De Luca, De Rosa, Marino, Moretti, Rossi, Bianchi, Colombo, Ferrari, Esposito

Liguria: Rossi, Ferrari, Bianchi, Russo, Martini, Rizzo, Conte, Costa, Ricci, Fontana

Emilia-Romagna: Ferrari, Russo, Bianchi, Ricci, Esposito

Among all the Northern Italian last names listed above, the most common one is Ferrero and its derivatives – Ferrari, Favre, and Fabbri.

The surname Ferrero is especially common in the Piedmont region, and the number one most diffused surname in the city of Turin.

If you are wondering, Ferrero comes from the Latin word ferrarius, which translates to iron worker. This is a great example of occupational names, which we’ll discuss later in this article.

Central Italy

Tuscany: Rossi, Bianchi, Ferrari, Esposito, Ricci

Umbria: Rossi, Bianchi, Ferrari, Romano, Ricci

Marche: Rossi, Bianchi, Ferrari, Esposito, Romano

Lazio: Rossi, Romano, Russo, Esposito, Ferrari

Southern Italian Last Names (including The Islands)

Abruzzo: Di Pietro, Di Benedetto, Di Rocco, Di Matteo, Di Marco, De Santis, D’Amico, D’Angelo, Colangelo, D’Andrea

Campania: Russo, Esposito, Rossi, Ferrara, Romano

Molise: De Luca, Di Stefano, Di Marco, Di Paolo, Di Nucci, Colangelo, Mancini, Di Lullo, Di Rocco, D’Amico

Puglia: Russo, Greco, Esposito, De Santis, Lombardo

Basilicata: De Luca, Greco, Martino, Di Maggio, Romano, Russo, Santoro, Vitale, Carbone, Marino

Calabria: Greco, Russo, De Luca, Esposito, Rizzo

Sicily: Russo, Greco, Esposito, Messina, Lombardo

Sardinia: Sanna, Carta, Mura, Melis, Cossu, Deiana, Floris, Piras, Marras, Sardu

As you might have realized there’s one common Italian family surname among all the regions; that’s Russo. The latter is the number one surname most popular in the South of Italy, and considering that’s a derivative of Rossi (the number one surname in the entire Italy) that’s no surprise.

This is an example of a surname that originated from physical characteristics. It refers to the color of the hair or the beard of the progenitor in the families that were first attributed this surname.

What is a Patronymic Name?

A patronymic surname is a surname that is derived from the given name of an individual’s father. It is formed by adding a suffix or other linguistic element to the father’s name, indicating a familial relationship. 

For example, if a man named Matteo had a son named Giovanni, the son’s patronymic surname might be “Mattei,” meaning “son of Matteo.” 

Patronyms were commonly used in the past, but they have become less common over time as fixed family surnames gained prominence. Nevertheless, they offer insights into family connections and contribute to the diverse range of surnames in various cultures.

Italian Patronymic Surnames

Below, you’ll find a list of the most common Italian patronymic surnames.

Brunello / Brunellesco / Brunelleschi

Daniele

D’Amico

D’Andrea / De Andrè

D’Anna

De Felice

De Feo

De Maria

De Martino

De Pretis

De Rocco

De Sanctis

De Santi

De Vita

Del Giudice

Del Greco

Del Piccolo

Del Prete

Del Tutto

Dell’Utri

Della Bianca

Della Giovanna / De Vanna

Della Vedova

Di Caro

Di Chiara

Di Grazia

Di Ludovico

Di Paoli

Di/Della Bella

Fittipaldi (son of Ubaldo)

Firidolfi (son of Rodolfo)

Filipepi (son of Filippo)

Giannini

Lorenzo

Lo Prete

Maffei

Mattei

Martino

Patronymic Names Formats Rules

As you can see above, there are different formats of patronymic surnames in Italy.

The most common ones are these:

  1. Surnames preceded by the preposition di or d’ (short for son of + the name of the father)
  2. The addition of the vowel i to the father’s name (like Maffei which stands for son of Maffeo)
  3. The addition of the particle ello to the name of the father
  4. Adding the particles fili, firi, or fetti before the father’s name or a shortened version; examples: Filipepi and Fittipaldi. These particles all stand for figlio di, which means son of.
  5. Using the father’s name as the surname without any changes.

The same rules apply to Matronymic names, which are surnames derived from the name of the mother. Maria and Martina are two common examples.

Italian Occupational Surnames

I think there’s something special and romantic about holding an Italian occupational surname, especially if one happens to have inherited the profession itself. Occupational surnames are simply surnames that reflect the occupation of the progenitor of the family. Here are a few examples with their meaning:

Barbieri (from barbiere, meaning barber)

Berrettaro (from berrettaro, meaning cap and hat maker)

Capraro (from capraro, meaning goatherd)

Fabbricatore (from fabbricatore, meaning builder)

Fornaciari (from fornaciaio, meaning a furnace owner)

Fornari (from fornaio, meaning baker)

Maestri (from maestro, meaning teacher)

Mugnai (from mugnaio, meaning a person who works a grain mill)

Muratori (from muratore, meaning bricklayer)

Notaro (from notaio, meaning notary)

Cantore (from cantore, meaning singer)

Pescatore (from pescatore, meaning fisherman)

Scarpari (from scarparo, meaning cobbler or shoemaker)

Scopino (from scopino, meaning street sweeper)

Tessitore (from tessitore, meaning weaver)

Vaccari (from vaccaro, meaning cowherd)

Vasaro (from vasaro, meaning potter)


ancient rome

Old Italian Last Names

The 5 oldest Italian last names we can find go back to Ancient Rome; they belonged to both noble and commoner families of that time. These are:

  1. Corvo
  2. Crasso
  3. Floro
  4. Gallo
  5. Tusco

Tusco likely is the oldest among these because it comes from Etruscan, and we know that Etruscans preceded the Romans.


Rare Italian Surnames

The rarest Italian Surnames happen to be also the sweetest, :). See for yourself.

The above are all different types of Italian desserts, from cakes to biscuits. Can you imagine your last name being Pandoro? I’d go for Alessia Millefoglie, what about you?


Unique Italian Last Names

I think it’s safe to say that the rare Italian surnames we saw just a second ago can also be considered unique, as far as surnames go.

Other unique, or even strange surnames, I found while doing my research follow. Mind you, these should also be classified as funny. I’ll tell you why in a second.

Long Italian Last names

The longest Italian last names must be these. Could you imagine anything longer?

And if you’d like to know, mine is 10 letters long, so on the longer side but certainly not as long as these.

What About the Shortest Italian Surnames? 

Here they come:

astonishingly funny italian surnames

Funny Italian Last Names

While there’s nothing funny about these animals, when it happens to be a surname these can be pretty hilarious: Cernia (meaning: grouper), Salamandra (meaning: salamander), Capra (meaning: goat), Gallina (meaning: hen), and the worst.. Maiale (meaning: pig).

The surnames that follow are simply funny and certainly not the best to pick from, if that was even possible.

I hope this made you laugh. I really couldn’t stop while I was writing this part. But the funniest ones are yet to come

Funniest Name + Surname Combinations

Imagine what you get when you pair a funny name and surname. These are in my opinion the worst name and surname pairings you could ever be given as a child. Read on. 

Surnames in bold.

Pagella Scolastica (meaning: school report)

Spargisale Marino (meaning: sea salt spreader)

Sarai Felice (meaning: you will be happy)

Corna Fedele (meaning: faithful horns)

Guido Collauto (meaning: I drive with a car)

Benvenuto Natale (meaning: welcome Christmas)

Carnevale Felice (meaning: happy Carnival)

Bagno Maria (meaning: water bath)

Lampa Dina (meaning: bulb)

Cozza Marina (meaning: marine mussel)

If you want more, have a look at this Italian article: Nomi e cognomi strani, assurdi e ridicoli (nomix.it)


Wealthy Italian Surnames

Wealthy and noble surnames in Italy are: Alberici, Della Gherardesca, Erba Odescalchi, Fioravanti, Gonzaga, Hercolani, Imperiale, Lante della Rovere, Notarbartolo, Sforza Cesarini.


Powerful Italian Last Names

By powerful one can imply different things, would you agree?

Noble and wealthy can also be powerful, and if that’s what you are after, then look at the list of surnames above this one.

If, on the other hand, you mean the criminal kind of power, then note that I will list those families’ surnames shortly.

Finally, powerful can also refer to governmental power. Here are some of the most powerful Italian surnames in politics.

Badass Italian Surnames

If you are looking for badass Italian surnames, you are likely looking to name a character in a novel you are writing or a video game you are creating.

In that case, these are the best badass Italian surnames I suggest.

Mafia Italian Last Names

Before I list a few last names belonging to Italian mafia families, please keep in mind that there might be honest people having these surnames that have nothing to do with organized crime in Italy.

Also, keep in mind that mafia is the general Italian name for this type of organization. Each region with this type of organized crime has its name. In Sicily, it’s called Cosa Nostra. In Calabria, it’s called Camorra. And in Puglia, they call it Sacra Corona Unita.

Mafia Italian Last Names in Sicily

Camorra Surnames in Calabria

Sacra Corona Unita Surnames in Puglia

Very Italian Last Names

In my opinion, the most Italian last names are the ones that are the most common. So let me share with you the top 10 most common Italian surnames.

  1. Rossi
  2. Ferrari
  3. Russo
  4. Esposito
  5. Bianchi
  6. Romano
  7. Gallo
  8. Costa
  9. Fontana
  10. Conti


italian family in the streets

Italian Last Names List: Top 500 Most Common Italian Last Names

If you want to check the meanings of famous Italian or lesser-know surnames, here is a list that will come in handy. 

Source: Classifica dei Cognomi più diffusi – Mappa dei Cognomi

First 50 Surnames in The Top 500 Most Common List

1. ROSSI – Derived from “rosso,” meaning red, often given to someone with red hair or a rosy complexion.

2. FERRARI – Refers to a blacksmith or ironworker, from the Italian word “ferro” for iron.

3. RUSSO – Means “Russian,” possibly used to identify people from the Byzantine Empire.

4. BIANCHI – Signifying “white,” likely given to someone with fair hair or a light complexion.

5. ROMANO – Indicates a person from Rome or someone with characteristics associated with the city.

6. GALLO – Translates to “rooster,” possibly given to someone with cocky or flamboyant traits.

7. COSTA – Derived from “costa,” meaning rib or side, often used to describe a person’s physical build.

8. FONTANA – Referring to a “fountain,” this name might relate to someone living by or working with fountains.

9. CONTI – Originally denoting a count or someone in a noble’s retinue.

10. ESPOSITO – Derived from “esposto,” meaning exposed or abandoned, historically given to foundlings.

11. RICCI – Means “curly,” likely describing someone with curly hair.

12. BRUNO – Signifying “brown,” this name might describe a person with brown hair or a dark complexion.

13. RIZZO – Means “curly,” similar to “ricci,” describing curly-haired individuals.

14. MORETTI – Derived from “moro,” meaning dark-skinned or Moorish.

15. DE LUCA – Indicates “of Luca,” referring to Saint Luke or the city of Lucca.

16. MARINO – Relates to the sea, possibly used for those who lived by or worked on the sea.

17. GRECO – Means “Greek,” used to identify individuals from Greece or Greek descent.

18. BARBIERI – Originally referred to barbers or beard trimmers.

19. LOMBARDI – Signifies “Lombard,” indicating someone from the Lombardy region.

20. GIORDANO – Derived from “Giordano,” the Italian form of Jordan, often given to children baptized in the river Jordan.

21. RINALDI – Indicates someone hailing from places called Rinaldo or Reynold.

22. COLOMBO – Translates to “dove,” symbolizing peace or spirituality.

23. MANCINI – Means “left-handed,” describing someone who favors their left hand.

24. LONGO – Signifying “tall” or “long,” often given to individuals of above-average height.

25. LEONE – Means “lion,” representing strength and courage.

26. MARTINELLI – Derived from “Martino,” related to Mars, the Roman god of war.

27. MARCHETTI – Refers to a “little warrior,” suggesting a brave or combative nature.

28. MARTINI – Indicates a connection to Saint Martin or the name Martin.

29. GALLI – Translates to “Gauls,” used to identify people from the Gaul region.

30. GATTI – Means “cats,” possibly describing agility or cunning.

31. MARIANI – Derived from “Marianus,” often associated with the Virgin Mary.

32. FERRARA – Indicates someone from the city of Ferrara.

33. SANTORO – Derived from “santo,” meaning saint, possibly given to a pious individual.

34. MARINI – Means “seamen,” used for people associated with the sea.

35. BIANCO – Signifies “white,” likely given to someone with fair hair or a light complexion.

36. CONTE – Originally denoted a count or someone in a noble’s retinue.

37. SERRA – Refers to a mountain range or someone living near hills.

38. FARINA – Means “flour,” possibly given to a miller or someone who worked with flour.

39. GENTILE – Signifies “gentile” or “noble,” given to someone of good birth or manners.

40. CARUSO – Derived from “caro,” meaning dear or beloved, possibly a term of endearment.

41. MORELLI – Means “dark-skinned,” often used to describe someone with a tan or darker complexion.

42. FERRI – Derived from “ferro,” meaning iron, often used for blacksmiths or ironworkers.

43. TESTA – Means “head,” possibly used to describe someone with a prominent head.

44. FERRARO – Refers to a blacksmith or ironworker, from the Italian word “ferro” for iron.

45. PELLEGRINI – Means “pilgrims,” often used for individuals who undertook pilgrimages.

46. GRASSI – Signifies “fat” or “plump,” possibly describing a person’s build.

47. ROSSETTI – Derived from “rosso,” meaning red, often given to someone with red hair or a ruddy complexion.

48. D’ANGELO – Means “of the angel,” indicating a connection to angelic or divine qualities.

49. BERNARDI – Derived from the name Bernard, often used to indicate sons of Bernard.

50. MAZZA – Translates to “mace” or “club,” possibly given to someone strong or authoritative.

51st to 100th MOST COMMON ITALIAN SURNAMES

51. RIZZI – Means “curly,” likely describing someone with curly hair.

52. SILVESTRI – Refers to a person living in a wooded or wild area, related to “silva” for woods.

53. VITALE – Means “vital” or “full of life,” indicating a lively personality.

54. FRANCO – Signifies someone of Frankish descent or possessing free qualities.

55. PARISI – Indicates someone from Paris or with ties to the city.

56. MARTINO – Indicates a connection to Saint Martin or the name Martin.

57. VALENTINI – Derived from “the Latin name “Valentinus,” often associated with the name Valentine.

58. CASTELLI – Means “castles,” possibly used for someone living near or working with castles.

59. BELLINI – Refers to a “small bell,” likely initially describing a bell maker or ringer.

60. MONTI – Signifies “mountains,” often used for people living in mountainous areas.

61. LOMBARDO – Signifies “Lombard,” indicating someone from the Lombardy region.

62. FIORE – Means “flower,” symbolizing beauty or a blossoming nature.

63. GRASSO – Signifies “fat” or “plump,” possibly describing a person’s build.

64. FERRO – Derived from “ferro,” meaning iron, often used for blacksmiths or ironworkers.

65. CARBONE – Means “coal,” possibly used for someone who worked with coal or had dark features.

66. ORLANDO – Derived from “Roland,” often used to honor the legendary knight Roland.

67. GUERRA – Means “war,” possibly describing a warrior-like nature.

68. PALMIERI – Refers to a “palm tree,” symbolizing victory or vitality.

69. MILANI – Derived from “Milan,” indicating someone from the city of Milan.

70. VILLA – Means “villa” or “estate,” possibly given to someone living on a large property.

71. VIOLA – Means “violet,” symbolizing modesty or humility.

72. RUGGERI – Derived from “Roger,” often used as a given name.

73. DE SANTIS – Means “of the saints,” indicating a connection to holy or sacred qualities.

74. D’AMICO – Signifies “of the friend,” suggesting friendly or amicable traits.

75. BATTAGLIA – Translates to “battle,” possibly describing a warrior or someone combative.

76. NEGRI – Means “black,” often used to describe someone with dark features.

77. SALA – Refers to a “hall” or “room,” possibly indicating someone who worked in a hall.

78. PALUMBO – Means “dove,” symbolizing peace or spirituality.

79. BENEDETTI – Means “blessed,” often used to indicate a fortunate or favored individual.

80. OLIVIERI – Derived from “olive tree,” symbolizing peace and fertility.

Sure, here are the remaining 20 surnames from 81 to 100:

81. GIULIANI – Derived from the given name “Julian,” often used as a patronymic.

82. ROSA – Means “rose,” symbolizing beauty or grace.

83. AMATO – Means “beloved,” often used as a term of endearment.

84. MOLINARI – Refers to a miller, someone who works with mills or milling.

85. ALBERTI – Derived from the given name “Albert,” often used as a patronymic.

86. BARONE – Signifies “baron,” indicating a noble title or status.

87. PELLEGRINO – Means “pilgrim,” often used for individuals who undertook pilgrimages.

88. PIAZZA – Refers to a “square” or “plaza,” possibly describing someone from a square or market area.

89. MORO – Signifies “Moor” or “dark-skinned,” often used to describe someone with a tan or darker complexion.

90. CAPUTO – Means “head,” possibly used to describe someone with a prominent head.

91. POLI – Derived from “poli,” meaning “bridge,” often used for someone living near a bridge.

92. VITALI – Means “vital” or “full of life,” indicating a lively personality.

93. DE ANGELIS – Means “of the angels,” indicating a connection to angelic or divine qualities.

94. D’AGOSTINO – Means “of August,” suggesting a connection to the month of August.

95. CATTANEO – Derived from “catta,” meaning “cat,” possibly describing agile or cunning traits.

96. BASSI – Means “short,” often used to describe someone of shorter stature.

97. VALENTE – Means “valiant” or “brave,” describing a courageous or strong-willed person.

98. COPPOLA – Refers to a “barrel maker” or someone who worked with barrels.

99. SPINELLI – Derived from “spinello,” meaning “little thorn,” possibly describing someone sharp-witted.

100. SARTORI – Means “tailor,” indicating someone who worked as a tailor.

101st to 150th ON THE LIST

101. MESSINA – Indicates an origin from the city of Messina in Sicily.

102. VENTURA – Translates to “fortune” or “luck,” suggesting a positive attribute.

103. BASILE – Derived from the Greek name “Basileios,” meaning “royal” or “kingly.”

104. MANTOVANI – Signifies an association with the city of Mantova in Italy.

105. STELLA – Means “star,” often symbolizing guidance or prominence.

106. BRUNI – Refers to a “brown-haired” individual.

107. PAPA – Possibly a title for a religious father or a term of respect.

108. ORLANDI – Connected to the name Orlando, possibly suggesting a connection to bravery or renown.

109. NERI – Means “black” or could allude to a dark-haired person.

110. LEONI – Indicates “lions,” often representing courage or strength.

111. RIVA – Refers to a “shore” or “bank” of a body of water.

112. VALENTI – Derived from “Valentinus,” possibly associated with valor or love.

113. POZZI – Means “wells,” likely indicating someone who lived near wells.

114. VOLPE – Translates to “fox,” possibly referring to cleverness or agility.

115. CATALANO – Suggests a connection to Catalonia, Spain, or the Catari people.

116. DONATI – Derived from “Donato,” this last name means “given” or “gifted.”

117. TOSI – Associated with the town of Tosse in Liguria, Italy.

118. GAGLIARDI – Means “strong” or “vigorous,” indicating physical prowess.

119. CALABRESE – Indicates an origin from the Calabria region in Italy.

120. VENTURINI – Variation of “Ventura,” symbolizing luck or good fortune.

121. PAGANO – Refers to a “pagan” or someone from a non-Christian background.

122. FERRETTI – Likely derived from “ferro,” meaning “iron,” possibly denoting strength.

123. DE MARCO – “Of Mark,” possibly referencing St. Mark or a person named Marco.

124. DI STEFANO – “Of Stephen,” indicating a connection to the name Stefano.

125. COSTANTINI – Derived from “Costantino,” meaning “steadfast” or “constant.”

126. GROSSI – Could mean “big” or “tall,” indicating a person’s physical stature.

127. PACE – Translates to “peace,” often symbolizing harmony or tranquility.

128. BASSO – Means “low” or “short,” possibly describing a person’s height.

129. PERRONE – Indicates an origin from the town of Perrone in Italy.

130. ZANETTI – Likely derived from the name “Giovanni,” indicating “God is gracious.”

131. MARCHI – Suggests a connection to the month of March or possibly a marketplace.

132. ROMEO – Associated with romance or could be derived from “pilgrim to Rome.”

133. MONACO – Refers to a “monk,” indicating a religious connection.

134. MAGGI – Could mean “May,” possibly denoting a person born in that month.

135. BIANCHINI – Derived from “bianco,” meaning “white,” possibly indicating hair color.

136. DE ROSA – “Of the rose,” suggesting a connection to the flower or the name Rosa.

137. FERRANTE – Variation of “Ferdinand,” possibly suggesting courage or adventure.

138. SANTINI – Derived from “Santo,” meaning “saintly” or “holy.”

139. SACCO – Means “bag” or “sack,” possibly referring to a trader or merchant.

140. VILLANI – Suggests a connection to the term “villain,” originally denoting a farm laborer.

141. D’ALESSANDRO – “Of Alexander,” indicating a connection to that name.

142. ROSSINI – Indicates “red-haired,” often describing physical appearance.

143. BEVILACQUA – Means “drink water,” suggesting a water-related occupation.

144. DE SIMONE – “Of Simon,” indicating a connection to that name.

145. PAGANI – Could mean “pagan,” referring to pre-Christian beliefs.

146. GIORGI – Derived from the name “George,” often associated with farming.

147. ROCCA – Means “rock” or “fortress,” symbolizing strength or stability.

148. BONETTI – Likely derived from “buono,” meaning “good,” suggesting virtue.

149. RUGGIERO – Variation of “Roger,” often symbolizing fame or renown.

150. MOSCA – Means “fly,” possibly alluding to a quick or agile nature.

NEXT 50 MOST COMMON SURNAMES IN ITALY

151. LEONARDI – Derived from “Leonardo,” often meaning “brave lion.”

152. SALERNO – Indicates an origin from the town of Salerno in Italy.

153. GRILLO – Means “cricket,” often referring to a lively or vibrant nature.

154. MOTTA – Refers to a “mound” or “hill,” suggesting a geographical connection.

155. FABBRI – Derived from “fabbrica,” meaning “factory” or “craftsman.”

156. GAROFALO – Translates to “carnation,” possibly alluding to a flower.

157. PASTORE – Means “shepherd,” often connected to herding or farming.

158. ALBANESE – Indicates an origin from Albania or Albanian heritage.

159. BALDI – Means “bald,” possibly describing a person’s appearance.

160. BIONDI – Refers to “blond” or “fair-haired,” often indicating hair color.

161. LANCIA – Means “spear,” possibly alluding to a warrior or strength.

162. MANFREDI – Derived from “Manfred,” possibly suggesting leadership or courage.

163. SANNA – Possibly a variant of “Sant’Anna,” associated with St. Anne.

164. PISANO – Indicates an origin from Pisa or Pisan heritage.

165. OLIVA – Translates to “olive,” often symbolizing peace or fertility.

166. BERTI – Likely derived from “Alberto,” indicating “noble” or “bright.”

167. MANCUSO – Suggests “left-handed,” possibly describing handedness.

168. GRIMALDI – Derived from “grimaldus,” meaning “helmeted” or “protected by a helmet.”

169. MARCHESE – Means “marquis,” indicating nobility or rank.

170. NARDI – Possibly related to “nardo,” a fragrant herb or plant.

171. RAIMONDI – Variation of “Raimondo,” indicating wise or protecting advice.

172. MASSA – Means “mass” or “bulk,” possibly referring to size or strength.

173. FILIPPI – Derived from “Filippo,” associated with horses or lovers of horses.

174. MAURO – Indicates “dark-skinned,” often describing a person’s complexion.

175. AGOSTINI – Variation of “Agostino,” meaning “venerable” or “respected.”

176. MELONI – Suggests “melon,” possibly alluding to a melon grower.

177. GATTO – Means “cat,” often describing agility or stealth.

178. SPINA – Translates to “thorn,” possibly symbolizing resilience or protection.

179. BARONI – Refers to a “baron” or noble title, indicating high rank.

180. BOSCO – Means “wood” or “forest,” suggesting a wooded area.

181. MARRA – Possibly derived from “amara,” meaning “bitter.”

182. MARINELLI – Derived from “marino,” meaning “mariner” or “of the sea.”

183. MELE – Translates to “apple,” often symbolizing temptation or knowledge.

184. DI MARCO – “Of Mark,” possibly referencing St. Mark or a person named Marco.

185. SERAFINI – Means “seraphim,” often associated with angels or holiness.

186. PICCOLO – Translates to “small” or “tiny,” often describing size.

187. PALMA – Means “palm tree,” symbolizing victory or triumph.

188. FRANCHI – Could mean “Frankish” or “free,” possibly denoting liberty.

189. D’ANDREA – “Of Andrew,” indicating a connection to that name.

190. BRUNETTI – Means “little brown-haired,” often describing physical appearance.

191. LAZZARI – Refers to a “thief” or “robber,” possibly indicating occupation.

192. FORTE – Means “strong” or “brave,” suggesting resilience.

193. PUGLIESE – Indicates an origin from the Puglia region in Italy.

194. FALCONE – Translates to “falcon,” symbolizing keenness or swiftness.

195. PALERMO – Indicates an origin from the city of Palermo in Sicily.

196. MERLO – Means “blackbird,” often associated with song or communication.

197. FUSCO – Indicates “dark” or “dusky,” often describing appearance.

198. ANGELINI – Derived from “Angelo,” often symbolizing an angelic connection.

199. SIMONETTI – Variation of “Simone,” indicating a connection to that name.

200. PEPE – Translates to “Joseph,” indicating “God will add” or “increase.”

201 to 250

201. SANTI – Derived from “Santo,” often indicating a holy or sacred connection.

202. SORRENTINO – Indicates an origin from Sorrento, a coastal town in Italy.

203. ROTA – Refers to “wheel” or “route,” possibly connected to travel.

204. MONTANARI – Suggests “mountain dweller,” often indicating a hilly origin.

205. GIRARDI – Derived from “Gerald,” indicating strength or rule.

206. VOLPI – Translates to “fox,” possibly alluding to cleverness or agility.

207. RICCARDI – Derived from “Riccardo,” often suggesting power or rule.

208. CAVALLO – Means “horse,” often symbolizing strength or vitality.

209. ARENA – Refers to a “sand” or “arena,” possibly suggesting a sandy area.

210. SPADA – Translates to “sword,” often symbolizing courage or nobility.

211. D’AMBROSIO – Means “son of Ambrogio,” indicating a familial connection.

212. TEDESCO – Means “German,” often indicating German heritage.

213. LOCATELLI – Likely indicates a connection to the town of Locatello.

214. COSTANZO – Derived from “Costanzo,” often suggesting steadfastness.

215. GIANNINI – Derived from “Giovanni,” indicating “God is gracious.”

216. LANZA – Means “lance” or “spear,” often associated with warfare.

217. MAGNANI – Suggests “great” or “noble,” often indicating importance.

218. ROSATI – Means “rose,” often symbolizing beauty or passion.

219. GRANDI – Means “large” or “great,” possibly indicating stature.

220. PIRAS – Indicates an origin from the Sardinian region in Italy.

221. NAPOLI – Indicates an origin from the city of Naples in Italy.

222. GIULIANO – Derived from “Julian,” indicating youth or vitality.

223. AIELLO – Likely related to the “garlic” plant, possibly suggesting farming.

224. MORI – Indicates “dark-skinned,” often describing a person’s complexion.

225. SACCHI – Translates to “bags” or “sacks,” possibly indicating trade.

226. DI BENEDETTO – Means “son of Benedetto,” suggesting a familial connection.

227. MARCONI – Derived from “Marco,” indicating “warlike” or “brave.”

228. MARCHESI – Indicates a “marquis,” often suggesting noble rank.

229. GROSSO – Means “big” or “fat,” often describing physical appearance.

230. STEFANI – Derived from “Stefano,” indicating “crown” or “wreath.”

231. BERNARDINI – Derived from “Bernardo,” often indicating “bold as a bear.”

232. CORTESE – Means “courteous” or “polite,” describing demeanor.

233. MARIOTTI – Derived from “Mario,” often suggesting strength or manliness.

234. MARTELLI – Translates to “hammer,” possibly alluding to craftsmanship.

235. PESCE – Means “fish,” often symbolizing fertility or abundance.

236. ROCCO – Often associated with “rock,” suggesting strength or stability.

237. BALDINI – Derived from “bald,” often describing a person’s appearance.

238. MAZZONI – Likely related to “mazza,” meaning “club” or “mace.”

239. DI LORENZO – “Of Lorenzo,” indicating a connection to that name.

240. RICCIARDI – Derived from “Riccardo,” often suggesting power or rule.

241. CAVALLARO – Means “horseman” or “rider,” often related to horsemanship.

242. SIMONE – Derived from “Simon,” often suggesting “hearing” or “listening.”

243. FAVA – Translates to “broad bean,” possibly related to farming.

244. COSTANTINO – Derived from “Costantino,” suggesting steadfastness.

245. ROSSO – Means “red,” often symbolizing vitality or intensity.

246. MORONI – Translates to “carrots,” possibly related to agriculture.

247. MAZZOLA – Derived from “mazza,” meaning “club” or “mace.”

248. CIRILLO – Derived from “Cyril,” indicating “lordly” or “sovereign.”

249. PAVAN – Refers to a “peacock,” often symbolizing beauty or pride.

250. ZANELLA – Indicates “little Zane,” possibly suggesting a nickname.

251 to 300

251. PINNA – Derived from the Sardinian word for “feather” or “fin.”

252. RUBINO – Means “ruby” in Italian.

253. GASPARINI – Derived from the name “Gaspare,” a form of “Gaspar,” meaning “treasure bearer.”

254. GUIDI – Likely derived from the Germanic name “Wido,” meaning “wood” or “wide.”

255. FRANCESCHINI – A diminutive form of “Francesco,” meaning “Frenchman” or “free man.”

256. SALVI – Derived from “Salvo,” a short form of “Salvatore,” meaning “savior.”

257. CARTA – Means “paper” in Italian, possibly referring to a profession involving paper.

258. CAVALLI – Means “horses” in Italian, possibly related to occupations involving horses.

259. PISANI – Denoting someone from the Italian city of Pisa.

260. CARBONI – Derived from “carbone,” meaning “coal.”

261. TREVISAN – Denoting someone from the town of Treviso in Italy.

262. GRAZIANO – Means “graceful” or “pleasing” in Italian.

263. CHIESA – Means “church” in Italian, likely indicating proximity to a church.

264. DI PIETRO – “Of Peter,” indicating descent from someone named Pietro (Peter).

265. GENOVESE – Denoting someone from the Italian city of Genoa.

266. RE – Means “king” in Italian.

267. BONI – Derived from “buono,” meaning “good” or “kind.”

268. FIORINI – Derived from “fiore,” meaning “flower.”

269. BELLI – Derived from “bello,” meaning “beautiful” or “handsome.”

270. MANCA – Means “missing” or “absent” in Italian.

271. NAPOLITANO – Denoting someone from the city of Naples in Italy.

272. PINTO – Derived from “pinto,” meaning “painted” or “spotted.”

273. COCCO – Likely derived from “cocco,” meaning “coconut.”

274. NATALE – Means “Christmas” in Italian, possibly indicating a Christmas-born child.

275. GUARINO – Derived from “guarire,” meaning “to heal” or “to cure.”

276. PASQUALI – Derived from “Pasqua,” meaning “Easter.”

277. VACCARO – Likely derived from “vaccaro,” meaning “cowherd” or “cattle driver.”

278. DI MARTINO – “Of Martin,” indicating descent from someone named Martino (Martin).

279. ANTONINI – Derived from “Antonio,” meaning “priceless” or “invaluable.”

280. PINI – Derived from “pino,” meaning “pine tree.”

281. GIUSTI – Derived from “giusto,” meaning “just” or “righteous.”

282. ABATE – Means “abbot” or “monk” in Italian.

283. BUCCI – Derived from “buco,” meaning “hole” or “gap.”

284. ANDREOLI – Derived from the name “Andrea,” meaning “manly” or “brave.”

285. SCOTTI – Likely derived from “scotto,” meaning “tart” or “sharp.”

286. BERARDI – Derived from “berardo,” meaning “brave as a bear.”

287. LANDI – Denoting someone from the Italian region of Lazio.

288. CASELLA – Derived from “casa,” meaning “house,” possibly indicating a location.

289. GIGLIO – Means “lily” in Italian.

290. BERETTA – Derived from “berretto,” meaning “cap” or “hat.”

291. ZANINI – Derived from “Giovanni,” meaning “God is gracious.”

292. ROMAGNOLI – Denoting someone from the region of Romagna in Italy.

293. TEDESCHI – Means “Germans” in Italian, possibly indicating a German origin.

294. CORTI – Derived from “corto,” meaning “short.”

295. COSENTINO – Denoting someone from the town of Cosentino in Italy.

296. GUIDA – Means “guide” or “leader” in Italian.

297. FORTUNATO – Means “fortunate” or “lucky” in Italian.

298. CIPRIANI – Derived from “Cipriano,” meaning “from Cyprus.”

299. CAMPANA – Means “bell” in Italian, possibly indicating a location near a bell tower.

300. PIVA – Derived from “piva,” meaning “bagpipe.”

301 to 350

301. FAZIO – Derived from “fazio,” meaning “good deed” or “favor.”

302. LEO – Derived from the name “Leo,” meaning “lion.”

303. NOVELLI – Derived from “novello,” meaning “new” or “young.”

304. CASTELLANI – Denoting someone from a castle or fortress.

305. ORSINI – Denoting someone from the Italian town of Orsino.

306. MASSARO – Derived from “massaro,” meaning “farmer” or “tenant.”

307. DIANA – Derived from the name “Diana,” possibly referring to the Roman goddess.

308. CROCE – Means “cross” in Italian, possibly related to religious symbolism.

309. BRAMBILLA – Denoting someone from the Italian town of Brambilla.

310. DAMIANI – Derived from the name “Damiano,” meaning “to tame” or “subdue.”

311. VENTURI – Denoting someone from the Italian town of Venturina.

312. BERTOLINI – Derived from “Bertolino,” a diminutive form of “Alberto.”

313. GRANATA – Means “grenade” in Italian, possibly referring to a military connection.

314. MAGGIO – Means “May” in Italian, possibly indicating a birth month.

315. MORANDI – Derived from “morando,” meaning “dwelling” or “residing.”

316. LAZZARINI – Derived from “Lazzaro,” the Italian form of “Lazarus.”

317. CAVALIERE – Means “knight” in Italian.

318. BELLONI – Denoting someone from the town of Bello in Italy.

319. CASTAGNA – Means “chestnut” in Italian.

320. NIGRO – Means “black” in Italian.

321. PASINI – Denoting someone from the town of Pase in Italy.

322. CASAGRANDE – Means “big house” in Italian, possibly indicating a location.

323. RANIERI – Derived from the name “Raniero,” meaning “wise army.”

324. NICOLETTI – Derived from “Nicola,” meaning “victorious people.”

325. CAPPELLI – Means “hats” in Italian, possibly related to occupations involving hats.

326. MELIS – Derived from “miele,” meaning “honey.”

327. FIORI – Means “flowers” in Italian.

328. PORTA – Means “door” in Italian.

329. FRANCHINI – Derived from “franco,” meaning “free” or “honest.”

330. DI CARLO – “Of Carlo,” indicating descent from someone named Carlo.

331. ROCCHI – Derived from “roccia,” meaning “rock” or “stone.”

332. MICHELI – Derived from “Michele,” the Italian form of “Michael.”

333. CARRARA – Denoting someone from the Italian town of Carrara.

334. LONGHI – Derived from “lungo,” meaning “long.”

335. TOSCANO – Denoting someone from the region of Tuscany.

336. PERINI – Derived from “Piero,” a diminutive form of “Pietro.”

337. PAOLINI – Derived from “Paolo,” the Italian form of “Paul.”

338. LORENZI – Derived from “Lorenzo,” the Italian form of “Lawrence.”

339. MAGNI – Derived from “magnifico,” meaning “magnificent” or “great.”

340. DURANTE – Means “during” or “lasting” in Italian.

341. BRUNELLI – Derived from “bruno,” meaning “brown.”

342. ROMANI – Denoting someone from the country of Rome (Italy).

343. BERTONI – Derived from “Berto,” a short form of “Alberto.”

344. VINCI – Derived from “vincere,” meaning “to conquer” or “to win.”

345. LA ROSA – Means “the rose” in Italian.

346. MASI – Derived from “maso,” meaning “farmhouse” or “hut.”

347. DONATO – Derived from “Donatus,” meaning “gifted” or “given.”

348. CORONA – Means “crown” in Italian.

349. COMUNE – Means “municipality” or “town” in Italian.

350. MAROTTA – Denoting someone from the Italian town of Marotta.

351 to 400

351. LUPO – Means “wolf” in Italian.

352. COLELLA – Derived from “Nicola,” meaning “victorious people.”

353. BOSIO – Denoting someone from the town of Bosio in Italy.

354. MURA – Denoting someone from a place named Mura.

355. VALENTINO – Derived from “Valentino,” meaning “strong” or “healthy.”

356. CURTI – Derived from “Curtis,” meaning “courtyard” or “enclosure.”

357. COLUCCI – Derived from “collo,” meaning “neck.”

358. ZANOTTI – Derived from “Giovanni,” meaning “God is gracious.”

359. MATTIOLI – Derived from “Mattia,” the Italian form of “Matthew.”

360. GABRIELLI – Derived from “Gabriel,” meaning “God is my strength.”

361. MICELI – Derived from “Michel,” the Italian form of “Michael.”

362. TURCO – Means “Turk” in Italian, possibly indicating a historical connection.

363. BONELLI – Derived from “Buono,” meaning “good” or “kind.”

364. NEGRO – Means “black” in Italian.

365. ZITO – Possibly derived from “zito,” meaning “lively” or “alert.”

366. FILIPPINI – Derived from “Filippo,” the Italian form of “Philip.”

367. MANZONI – Denoting someone from the Italian town of Manzoni.

368. BORGHI – Denoting someone from a borough or small town.

369. ALBANO – Denoting someone from the town of Albano Laziale in Italy.

370. FERRERO – Derived from “Ferraro,” meaning “blacksmith.”

371. CARLI – Derived from “Carlo,” the Italian form of “Charles.”

372. CAPPELLETTI – Means “little hat” in Italian.

373. MORELLO – Means “dark-skinned” or “brown” in Italian.

374. BERTOLI – Derived from “Berto,” a short form of “Alberto.”

375. ANSELMI – Derived from “Anselmo,” meaning “divine protection.”

376. LUPI – Derived from “Lupo,” meaning “wolf.”

377. LA ROCCA – Means “the rock” in Italian.

378. MARANGONI – Derived from “marangone,” meaning “stork.”

379. BARTOLI – Derived from “Bartolo,” the Italian form of “Bartholomew.”

380. MASSARI – Derived from “Massaro,” meaning “farmer” or “tenant.”

381. MAURI – Derived from “Maurizio,” the Italian form of “Maurice.”

382. MARI – Derived from “Mario,” the Italian form of “Marius.”

383. DI GIOVANNI – “Of Giovanni,” indicating descent from someone named Giovanni.

384. FANTINI – Derived from “Fantino,” a diminutive of “Stefano.”

385. MAFFEI – Derived from “Matteo,” the Italian form of “Matthew.”

386. MILANO – Denoting someone from the city of Milan.

387. ALESSI – Derived from “Alessio,” the Italian form of “Alexius.”

388. PUCCI – Derived from “Puccio,” a diminutive of “Pietro.”

389. VACCA – Means “cow” in Italian.

390. RICCIO – Means “curly-haired” in Italian.

391. QUARANTA – Means “forty” in Italian.

392. IPPOLITO – Derived from “Ippolito,” meaning “freer of horses.”

393. TONELLI – Derived from “Antonio,” the Italian form of “Anthony.”

394. VECCHI – Derived from “vecchio,” meaning “old.”

395. FUMAGALLI – Derived from “Fumagallo,” this Italian surname refers to a location.

396. GIOIA – Means “joy” in Italian.

397. LUCIANI – Derived from “Luciano,” meaning “light” or “illumination.”

398. FESTA – Means “celebration” or “party” in Italian.

399. TARANTINO – Denoting someone from the Italian town of Taranto.

400. CLEMENTE – Derived from “Clement,” meaning “gentle” or “merciful.”

401 to 450

401. CORSINI – Derived from “Corso,” meaning “course” or “path.”

402. GRAZIANI – Derived from “Graziano,” meaning “pleasing” or “gracious.”

403. ADAMO – Derived from “Adam,” the first man in the Bible.

404. NICOLINI – Derived from “Nicola,” meaning “victorious people.”

405. FURLAN – Denoting someone from the region of Friuli in Italy.

406. GOBBI – Means “hunchback” in Italian.

407. SCALA – Means “staircase” or “ladder” in Italian.

408. FALCO – Means “falcon” in Italian.

409. VISCONTI – Denoting a noble title, originally meaning “vice-count” in Italian.

410. GAMBA – Means “leg” or “paw” in Italian.

411. GRANDE – Means “big” or “great” in Italian.

412. POGGI – Derived from “Poggio,” meaning “hill” or “knoll.”

413. GUARNIERI – Derived from “Guarnerio,” meaning “warrior” or “protector.”

414. BERTINI – Derived from “Berto,” a short form of “Alberto.”

415. FEDERICI – Derived from “Federico,” the Italian form of “Frederick.”

416. GUERRINI – Derived from “Guerino,” meaning “warrior” or “soldier.”

417. GENTILI – Means “gentle” or “kind” in Italian.

418. GUGLIELMI – Derived from “Guglielmo,” the Italian form of “William.”

419. ABBATE – Derived from “abbate,” meaning “abbot.”

420. NOBILE – Means “noble” in Italian.

421. CAPELLI – Derived from “capello,” meaning “hat” or “head.”

422. BONO – Means “good” in Italian.

423. D’AMATO – Derived from “amato,” this surname means “beloved.”

424. ORSI – Means “bears” in Italian.

425. SPERANZA – Means “hope” in Italian.

426. BARBATO – Derived from “barba,” meaning “beard.”

427. PICCOLI – Means “small” or “little” in Italian.

428. DE MARCHI – “Of Marchi,” possibly indicating a family name.

429. BETTI – Derived from “Elisabetta,” the Italian form of “Elizabeth.”

430. LORENZINI – Derived from “Lorenzo,” the Italian form of “Lawrence.”

431. ALBERTINI – Derived from “Alberto,” the Italian form of “Albert.”

432. BARTOLINI – Derived from “Bartolo,” the Italian form of “Bartholomew.”

433. D’ONOFRIO – Derived from “Onofrio,” meaning “vigorous” or “energetic.”

434. DEL VECCHIO – “Of the old,” indicating an ancestor’s age or seniority.

435. GALLINA – Means “hen” or “chicken” in Italian.

436. CONTINI – Derived from “Costantino,” the Italian form of “Constantine.”

437. PETRUCCI – Derived from “Pietro,” the Italian form of “Peter.”

438. RONCHI – Means “ditches” or “ravines” in Italian.

439. CAPRA – Means “goat” in Italian.

440. BRESCIANI – Denoting someone from the city of Brescia in Italy.

441. MORETTO – Means “dark-skinned” or “brown” in Italian.

442. POLETTI – Derived from “Paolo,” the Italian form of “Paul.”

443. CASTELLANO – Means “castle dweller” in Italian.

444. TOMASI – Derived from “Tommaso,” the Italian form of “Thomas.”

445. GRIECO – Means “Greek” in Italian.

446. ELIA – Derived from “Elijah,” a biblical name.

447. BOTTA – Means “blow” or “hit” in Italian.

448. MAGRI – Means “thin” or “slim” in Italian.

449. ANGELI – Derived from “Angelo,” meaning “angel” or “messenger.”

450. SABATINI – Derived from “Sabato,” meaning “Saturday.”

FINAL 50 MOST COMMON ITALIAN SURNAMES

451. TORRE – Means “tower” in Italian.

452. VISENTIN – Denoting someone from the region of Veneto in Italy.

453. PERNA – Means “leg” or “ham” in Italian.

454. TUCCI – Derived from “Tuccio,” a diminutive of “Tuccio.”

455. FIORENTINO – Denoting someone from Florence (Firenze) in Italy.

456. GENNARI – Derived from “Gennaro,” the Italian form of “Januarius.”

457. MONTAGNA – Means “mountain” in Italian.

458. SALVATORE – Derived from “Salvatore,” meaning “savior” in Italian.

459. CORSI – Denoting someone from the region of Corsica or “course” in Italian.

460. PALAZZO – Means “palace” or “building” in Italian.

461. IZZO – Derived from “Isaia,” the Italian form of “Isaiah.”

462. SCHIAVONE – Derived from “schiavo,” meaning “slave.”

463. SASSO – Means “rock” or “stone” in Italian.

464. MUSSO – Possibly derived from “musso,” meaning “muzzle” in Italian.

465. CAMPANELLA – Means “bell” or “little bell” in Italian.

466. CAMPAGNA – Means “countryside” or “field” in Italian.

467. VECCHIO – Means “old” in Italian.

468. CASALI – Means “houses” or “village” in Italian.

469. CECCARELLI – Derived from “Cecco,” a diminutive of “Francesco.”

470. FEDELE – Means “faithful” or “loyal” in Italian.

471. REALE – Means “royal” in Italian.

472. STEFANELLI – Derived from “Stefano,” the Italian form of “Stephen.”

473. BERTELLI – Derived from “Berto,” a short form of “Alberto.”

474. BELTRAMI – Means “good friend” in Lombardic.

475. ALFIERI – Derived from “Alfiere,” meaning “standard-bearer” or “ensign.”

476. GHEZZI – Derived from “Ghez,” a Lombardic name.

477. ZANI – Derived from “Giovanni,” the Italian form of “John.”

478. INNOCENTI – Means “innocent” in Italian.

479. BORRELLI – Derived from “Borel,” a diminutive of “Guglielmo.”

480. CECCHINI – Derived from “Cecchino,” a diminutive of “Francesco.”

481. BONINI – Derived from “Buono,” meaning “good” in Italian.

482. MANZO – Means “mutton” or “lamb” in Italian.

483. BONFANTI – Derived from “Buono,” meaning “good” in Italian, and “fante,” meaning “infantryman.”

484. SPAGNOLO – Means “Spanish” in Italian.

485. BETTINI – Derived from “Betto,” a diminutive of “Alberto.”

486. ZAMBELLI – Derived from “Zambo,” a short form of “Giovanni.”

487. GALASSO – Derived from “Galasso,” a name of Germanic origin.

488. DRAGO – Means “dragon” in Italian.

489. LAI – Possibly derived from “Lao,” a short form of “Eulalio.”

490. MATTEI – Derived from “Matteo,” the Italian form of “Matthew.”

491. D’ELIA – Derived from “Elia,” the Italian form of “Elijah.”

492. BRUSCHI – Derived from “Brusco,” meaning “rough” or “harsh.”

493. CAPONE – Means “big head” in Italian.

494. PAOLETTI – Derived from “Paolo,” the Italian form of “Paul.”

495. SIMONI – Derived from “Simone,” the Italian form of “Simon.”

496. VIVIANI – Derived from “Viviano,” meaning “alive” or “lively.”

497. BINI – Derived from “Bino,” a short form of “Albino.”

498. FEDERICO – Derived from “Federico,” the Italian form of “Frederick.”

499. PIZZI – Derived from “pizzo,” meaning “lace” or “point.”

500. FLORIO – Derived from “Fiore,” meaning “flower” in Italian.

NB: Please keep in mind that in many cases these explanations are just an indication. As far as I know, there’s no formal database with the real meaning of all Italian surnames.


Italian Last Names in America

Italian Americans, I wonder whether you hear these surnames all the time. 

Below are the top 10 most common Italian last names in the US according to the latest available census.

  1. Russo
  2. Marino
  3. Bruno
  4. Romano
  5. Rossi
  6. Esposito
  7. Gallo
  8. Caruso
  9. Rizzo
  10. Greco


Final Thoughts

Italian last names are like special family labels, telling the story of the person who has it. They also say a lot about history, culture, and family connections, almost as if there were time capsules holding stories from long ago. Names like “Rossi” have been around forever, while double barrel surnames are a more recent practice. 

Whether you’re learning about your Italian family history or just curious about Italian last names, I hope this article has helped you understand the most common ones in Italy.


Frequently Asked Questions About Italian Surnames

Where Do Italian Surnames Come From?

Italian surnames originated in the Middle Ages and can be derived from occupations, locations, nicknames, patronymics (based on the father’s name), or physical characteristics.

What are the Most Common Italian Last Names? 

The most common Italian surnames are Rossi, Russo, Ferrari, Esposito, and Bianchi. 

Is Gucci a Common Last Name in Italy?

No, Gucci is not a very common last name in Italy. It’s most famously associated with the luxury brand Gucci rather than being a widespread surname.

What is an Italian patronymic surname?

A patronymic surname is derived from the given name of the father. Common examples are names starting with “Di” like Di Matteo or Di Benedetto.

What is a Tuscan last name? 

Some typical Tuscan surnames are Bianchi, Rossi, Neri, Bellini, and Morelli.

Common Sicilian surnames include Russo, Lombardo, Messina, and Greco.

What are the surname rules in Italy?

– Women traditionally keep their maiden name and do not take their husband’s surname.

– Children often take their father’s surname but parents can also choose to give the mother’s surname.

– Double surnames combining both parents’ names have become more common.

What is the most common surname in Rome?

The most common surname in Rome is Rossi.

Are Italian surnames gendered?

No, Italian surnames are not gendered and do not change based on whether the person is male or female.

Do Italians take their husbands’ surname?

Traditionally, Italian women keep their maiden surname and do not take their husband’s surname after marriage.

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